Stanley Cup celebrations: Tampa to honor Lightning with boat parade, sold-out fan rally

Lightning

EDMONTON, ALBERTA – SEPTEMBER 28: Zach Bogosian #24 of the Tampa Bay Lightning skates with the Stanley Cup following the series-winning victory over the Dallas Stars in Game Six of the 2020 NHL Stanley Cup Final at Rogers Place on September 28, 2020 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) — Celebratory plans were put in place and announced quickly after the Tampa Bay Lightning won the Stanley Cup Monday night in Game 6 against the Dallas Stars.

The team returned with The Cup on Tuesday night and players were able to reunite with their families for the first time since they entered the National Hockey League bubble at the end of July.

The players landed in Tampa around 5 p.m. and had an on-ice celebration at Amalie Arena with their families, the Lightning staff and other VIPs.

A celebration with the public is scheduled to take place on Wednesday. The City of Tampa and the Lightning have planned a boat parade and fan rally Wednesday evening. The news release from the city says both events will be socially distant.

The 2020 Stanley Cup Champions Boat Parade is set to take place at 5 p.m. on the Hillsborough River. The parade will be followed by a Stanley Cup Champions Celebration at Raymond James Stadium that’s set to begin at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets to the Raymond James event were free but needed to be claimed online ahead of time. By 3:15 p.m. Tuesday, just more than two hours after they were made available, all tickets were gone.

“Tickets are sold out now. Check back soon,” a message on the Ticketmaster website read.

If you did get tickets to the Raymond James event, free parking event begins at 5:30 p.m. Doors open at 6:30.

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