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GOP senator from SC proposes policing changes in newly-unveiled ‘Justice Act’

Washington D.C.

WASHINGTON (NEXSTAR) — South Carolina Senator Tim Scott (R-SC) laid out the Republican plan for police reform on Wednesday alongside Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and a team of GOP lawmakers.

“(There are) three major areas,” Scott said.

The Republican senator’s “Justice Act” includes grant money for body cameras, a commission to review the nation’s current law enforcement system and data collection on use of force.

The bill doesn’t include a ban on chokeholds, as was previously discussed. While he was signing an executive order on Tuesday, President Donald Trump said chokeholds will be banned under a new credentialing process, “except if an officer’s life is at risk.”

The GOP bill also doesn’t include a ban on “no-knock” warrants, which allow officers to enter someone’s home without prior permission. Louisville, Kentucky banned them last week. The new ordinance was named for Breonna Taylor, who was fatally shot by officers who burst into her home.

“Banning no knocks doesn’t sound like a solid position based on any data because we don’t have that data,” Scott said during the press conference Wednesday morning.

Scott found significance in introducing the “Justice Act” on the anniversary of the Charleston church shooting that took the lives of nine black worshippers at the hands of a white gunman.

“June 17, a Wednesday five years later, to be in a position to hopefully restore a little more hope,” Scott said.

McConnell said he’ll bring Scott’s bill to the senate floor for debate by next week. Republicans, including President Trump, want Democrats to get on board.

“We want very strong police, I want law and order,” President Trump said Wednesday.

But Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) said action is needed and that the GOP bill called only for data.

“The Senate Republican proposal on policing does not rise to the moment,” Schumer said.

Scott wants a vote on his bill before the July 4 recess.

The fireworks will come early as both bills will be up for debate next week.

Read the proposed Justice Act here:

Copyright 2020 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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