Rare species of fish collected in recent Florida deep-sea investigation

Florida

TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) – What’s REALLY living down in the deepest part of the sea? Turns out we’re still figuring it out. On a recent SEAMAP cruise of the deep waters of the ocean, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute added a few species of rare fish that are typically not encountered.

Of these unusual species, the FWRI collected a shortfin scorpionfish and a streamer searobin. The fish have been added into their Florida Biodiversity Collection’s (FBC) ichthyology collection which currently houses over 36,000 preserved specimens. Such collections create a historical record of Florida’s marine biodiversity and serve as an invaluable resource for scientific and educational purposes.

Check out these unusual creatures from the deep we would otherwise never get to see:

Dorsal fin spines are venomous, causing a lingering pain if they penetrate the skin.
Hunchback Scorpionfish- dorsal fin spines are venomous, causing a lingering pain if they penetrate the skin.
Greenband Wrasse- like many Wrasses, it goes through several different color changes, termed “phases,” as it matures. Employs labriform locomotion, where the pectoral fins are the primary means of swimming as opposed to the tail.
Shortfin Scorpionfish- dorsal fin spines are venomous, causing a lingering pain if they penetrate the skin. Can be identified by the bright yellow coloration present on the underside of its pectoral fins.
 Mushroom Scorpionfish- named for the inverted mushroom-shaped cirri overhanging the pupil.

Want to see more crazy creatures from the deepest parts of Florida’s oceans? Check out the entire collection here.

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