Campbell's new med school aims to keep physicians in NC - WFLA News Channel 8

Campbell's new med school aims to keep physicians in NC

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Campbell University's School of Osteopathic Medicine is loaded with state of the art technology that allows students to take what they learn in the classroom and apply it to real life situations. Campbell University's School of Osteopathic Medicine is loaded with state of the art technology that allows students to take what they learn in the classroom and apply it to real life situations.
BUIES CREEK, N.C. -

North Carolina's newest medical school is now open.

Campbell University's School of Osteopathic Medicine started classes on Monday, welcoming its inaugural class of 162 students.

The university's mission is to prepare students to serve as primary care doctors in under-served and rural areas.

"We believe by getting the students out in the communities that they want to practice in, they will put down roots and form a bond," explained Dr. John Kauffman, founding dean.

Students spend two years training at Campbell, then finish the four-year program serving in area hospitals.

Demand for primary care physicians is expected to increase sharply as people age, the state's population grows and health insurance laws change. In fact, studies show there will be a shortage of about 90,000 physicians in the U.S. by 2020.

The school will be the second largest in the state behind the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It will eventually graduate 150 new physicians each year.

It will be the only school training osteopathic doctors, who emphasize wellness and disease prevention alongside traditional methods.

North Carolina's other three medical schools are Duke, Wake Forest and East Carolina University.

The school is loaded with state of the art technology that allows students to take what they learn in the classroom and apply it to real life situations.

Several simulation labs give the students hands-on experience where instructors can surprise them with traumatic situations to see how the students think on their feet.

"I think it's going to help a lot with the shock factor when we get to the real world," said med student Richard Baggaley.

Less than 50 percent of N.C. med school graduates stay in the state. The goal at Campbell is to give the students the best medical training around, so they can take it to the rural communities in North Carolina where people need it most.

"I'd like to stay in North Carolina," said Baggaley, "This area has given me an amazing education and I'd love to stay here and give back."

Jonathan Rodriguez

Born in California but growing up in South Carolina, Jonathan Rodriguez joined WNCN in June 2013 as a digital journalist. More>>

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